Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Identity Theft – Checking Your Child’s Credit

In today’s identity theft blog, we’ll look at checking your child’s credit.

How Will I Know If I Am a Victim of Identity Theft?

  • READ YOUR BILLS – search for charges you did not buy that may indicate identity theft.
  • WATCH YOUR BANK STATEMENTS – any withdrawals you did not make?
  • CHECK YOUR MAIL – getting a new bill you did not know about?
  • GET YOUR CREDIT REPORT – are there accounts you don’t recognize?
  • HAS YOUR FINANCIAL INSTITUTION REPLACED YOUR CREDIT/DEBIT CARD?

Checking Your Child’s Credit Report

To check your child’s credit report, you must mail or fax documentation to the three major credit reporting agencies proving that you are their parent or guardian. This may include copies of the child’s birth certificate and Social Security card, your ID and a list of the last few addresses for the child.  Each of the three major credit bureaus – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – has its own process for checking a minor’s credit report. Check the individual credit union’s website, provided below, to get more details. It may be possible to freeze or lock your child’s credit to prevent identity theft. The methods differ for each credit reporting agency, so you would need to check with each one on its policies.

Credit Reporting Agencies

You can also get your free credit reports and scores through creditkarma.com.

 

In our identity theft series, we’ll continue to answer questions and provide information about these issues:

What Can I Do?

  • Request a free copy of your medical records if medical information, such as diagnoses, procedure codes, and health insurance info, has been stolen.
  • You have the right to an attorney before you sign legal papers.
  • If you are offered credit checks, they are free on creditkarma.com.
  • Dispute errors in your credit report.
  • How long do you have to sue after discovering identity theft?

 

VISIT WWW.USA.GOV/CREDIT-REPORTS FOR MORE INFORMATION.

*Nothing on this website should be considered legal advice. This does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and this law firm.